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Rise And Fall Of The ‘Dravidian’ Justice Party

The book ‘The Rise and Fall of the ‘Dravidian’ Justice party, 1916-1946’ is based on a speech delivered at Roja Muthiah Research Library, Chennai on 4th September 2009. More argues in this book that the non-Brahmin Justice party came into existence in the year 1916 in order to counter Tamil Brahmin domination of the political and administrative life of the Madras Presidency. It was promoted mainly by elite non-Tamil Telugu businessmen and zamindars like Pitti Theagaraja Chetty. It was later taken over by E.V. Ramasamy Naiker of Telugu-Kannada ancestry who renamed the Justice party as the DravidarKazhagam (Dravidian party). The Justice party remained a preserve of Telugu stalwarts right from its inception until it was converted to theDravidar Kazhagam by E.V. Ramasamy Naiker, known popularly as Periyar. Tamil stalwarts played always a...

100 95

Book Details

Pages

64

Publisher

Institute for Research in Social Science & Humanities

Language

English

ISBN

Released

01/01/2016

About The Author

J.B.Prashanth More

J.B.Prashant More is a historian of international repute. He was born in Pondicherry on 28th August 1955. He studied at St.Joseph of Cluny school and Petit Seminaire, Pondicherry. After obtaining a bachelor's degree from Tagore Arts College, Pondicherry, he proceeded to France for higher studies. He obtained a Ph.D in History at the renowned Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales, Paris. He is member of the Institute for Research in Social Sciences and Humanities. After facing several setbacks in his scholarly pursuit, he took to writing history.

Since 2001 Prashant More has authored more than fifteen books and several articles. He is a specialist of south Indian history, especially Muslim and Dravidian history as well as the colonial history of India. His book on the Partition of India remains unchallenged to this day. He writes in French, English and Tamil. Currently he teaches at Inseec, Paris.

His mother tongue is Tamil. He holds French nationality. His father, Panjab Rao More is a Marathi Bhakti poet.His mother belongs to the ilustrious Prouchandy family of Pondicherry, whose members have played significant roles in the history of Pondicherry. One of them, Darmanathan Prouchandy was the first steam navigator from south India and the Tamil country. His grand father had played a martyr's role in India's freedom movement due to his association with the Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose's freedom struggle in south-east Asia (French Indochina, Saigon).

The book ‘The Rise and Fall of the ‘Dravidian’ Justice party, 1916-1946’ is based on a speech delivered at Roja Muthiah Research Library, Chennai on 4th September 2009. More argues in this book that the non-Brahmin Justice party came into existence in the year 1916 in order to counter Tamil Brahmin domination of the political and administrative life of the Madras Presidency. It was promoted mainly by elite non-Tamil Telugu businessmen and zamindars like Pitti Theagaraja Chetty. It was later taken over by E.V. Ramasamy Naiker of Telugu-Kannada ancestry who renamed the Justice party as the DravidarKazhagam (Dravidian party). The Justice party remained a preserve of Telugu stalwarts right from its inception until it was converted to theDravidar Kazhagam by E.V. Ramasamy Naiker, known popularly as Periyar. Tamil stalwarts played always a subordinate role in the Justice party as they were not in a position to counter the wealthy Telugu zamindari influence on the party.

     For the Justice party leaders, the Tamil Brahmins were of Aryan origin, while the non-Brahmin Tamils wereDravidian, sons of the soil. The Brahmins themselves contributed to the development of this racial theory as they rarely countered the propaganda of the Justice party leaders. However, some Tamil Brahmin stalwarts like Subramania Bharati claimed that Brahmins belonged to a mixed race. As a matter of fact, there were fair as well as dark Brahmins found all over the Tamil country. In spite of this the racial theory gained more ground especially with the emergence of the Dravidar Kazhagam. However while the non-Brahmin Tamils considered all south Indian non-Brahmins as Dravidians, many Telugus looked upon the non-Brahmin Tamils alone as Dravidians. Under the name ‘Dravidian’, many Telugus of the Madras presidency were able to dominate or play a significant role in the politics of the Madras Presidency and Thamizhnadu, though their mother tongue was not Tamil. This contributed to the decline of the political fortunes of the elite Tamil Brahmins whose mother tongue was always Tamil.